Posted in AALL, Professional Development

AALL Annual Meeting, Day Four

The Annual Meeting always seems to fly by!  I began today’s programming by attending G2: Meeting the Needs of Students and Their Future Employers: Discussions on Legal Research Instruction and Student Services Inspired by Practitioner Feedback.  Based on a recent ALL-SIS Task Force survey, Shawn Nevers of Brigham Young briefly surveyed the results of the survey for attendees and Maureen Cahill of the University of Georgia discussed how student services librarians could use these results to improve upon services to students.  The entire results of the task force survey can be found on the ALL-SIS website on AALLnet.  As with much of this year’s programming, the panelists spoke briefly and the remainder of the time was attendee group discussions.  What was neat about these breakout sessions, however, was that moderators at each table wrote down the table’s ideas, and the program coordinators will now gather all of these ideas and share them with the rest of us.

In the afternoon I attended H4: Emerging Technologies and Teaching for the 21st Century Librarian.  Discussing tools to use when presenting with your iPad and how to use now-familiar screencasting programs like Adobe Captivate and Camtasia to record lectures and tutorials for your patrons, presenters Stephanie Noble of the U.S. Courts 10th Circuit library and Jennifer Wondracek of the University of Florida left attendees with many great tools to try out when we get home.  

It’s always a little sad to see the Annual Meeting end, and it’s hard to leave such a lovely city, but it has been a great conference, I learned a lot, and I feel I’m headed back to Indiana armed with an arsenal of tools, tips, and tricks to better my teaching and service to our patrons.

I hope to see many of you again next year in San Antonio!

Author:

I am the Assistant Director for Public Services at Indiana University's Maurer School of Law. My research interests include exploring how emerging and existing technologies can be used to enhance library services and legal education as well as how to address knowledge gaps and meet the educational expectations of today's law students.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s